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Scared, cold, in pain, the dust hasn't settled yet.
Pinned in, crying, my clothes are ripped, red, and wet.
Lights, noise, and confusion, all part of the night.
I'm going to die alone, give up the fight.

Red lights are flashing, mixing with blue.
A face appears at my window, the face is you.
"You're gonna be all right" is the first thing you say.
A reassuring voice, someone wants me to stay.

You could have been home with family, they need you too.
You worked all day at the job, your sleeping hours numbered two.
But you went down the hall, hoping your family is OK.
Now you're here with me and death, with comforting words to say.

No time for yourself, no thought for your safety.
Later you may think, your decision was hasty.
"Get the Jaws. Watch that glass.  Keep the people away.
Get his vitals, hose this down." Some of the things I hear them say.

You stand in gas, look in my window, show no fear.
I look back at you knowing, your voice is the last I'll ever hear.
I fade away as you hold me, while holding back your tears.
Thank you for being there, you brave volunteer.
The Clairton Volunteer Fire Department / EMS Division claims no responsibility for the existence of the above
poems.  The poems are posted in various sites on the internet with several credited.  The true credits are
unsure.   The poems are only provided for entertainment purposes and are property of their respective authors.
Poems
The way you love may not matter at all
But you never know, it might.

And just in case it could be
That another's life, through you
Might possibly change for the better
With a broader and brighter view
It seems it might be worth a try
At pointing the way to the right
Of course it may not matter at all
But then again... it might
"Just Another Call"

"Two car MVA with injuries," the dispatcher confessed, my fears grew worse as I got dressed.  At the
station, everyone came, Firefighters, EMTs, policemen who were the same.  They all knew it would be
As the pager tones sounded for that dreaded call, the adrenaline pumped, the fear wound up in a ball.
people bawled, we counted five people in all.  Two adults and two kids in one car, one drunk in the
other, killed on impact were a father and mother.  We told the chief to come and see, the police were
bad.  We all prayed that for some family, tonight would not turn sad.  At the scene, steam hissed,
needed, so was the M.E.  We covered the first two so the kids couldn't see, their parents had ceased
to be.  The drunk driver had a mere scratch, the other injuries would be no match.  A boy and a girl,
who were both wearing seat belts, all we could see were just some welts.  Unannounced to us,
because it was all we could see, both kids had closed head injuries.  Pulses dropped, blood
pressures, went sky high, we knew what it meant, but we weren't about to let them die.  We left the
scene, racing down the road, lights and sirens, that was our code.    We got to the hospital, not a
moment too soon, as we lept from the rig, we saw the full moon.  We got back to our senses, rushed
the kids inside, time was of the essence, since two had already died.  The police arrived at the
hospital you know, the drunk driver between them, his head hung low.  The kids went from the E.R. to
the O.R. in no time flat, the police said the mother was Veronica, the father was Matt.  Paperwork was
finished, the rig equipment cleaned, we hung around for a while, but hours it seemed.  We waited and
waited for news from nurse Able, our hopes were soon dashed, both kids died on the table.  When we
got to the firehouse, everyone was still there, they were just talking, saving us a chair.  We all talked,
some of us cried, over the fact that one was alive, and a family had died.  The funerals were held
sometime later, we asked to attend, we all went, it helped us to mend.  Family was there, friends were
too, they all thanked us, for it was the best that we could do.

in training without pay,
And, I'll show you a volunteer.

Show me a person where a cry for help brings
split-second dispatch,
And, I'll show you a volunteer.

Show me a person who is devastated when
lives are lost or maimed,
And, I'll show you a volunteer.

Show me a person who is graciously welcomed
as a next-door neighbor,
And, I'll show you a volunteer.

Show me a person who takes ridicule more than
compliments,
And, I'll show you a volunteer.

Show me a person whose car is garaged with
the grille facing out,
And, I'll show you a volunteer.

Show me a person who sacrifices home life,
TV... even tender moments,
And, I'll show you a volunteer.

Show me a person visibly moved at the strains
of our National Anthem,
And, I'll show you a volunteer.

Show me a person who may be asked to give
more than just dedication,
And, I'll show you a volunteer.

Show me a person who is asked to give more...
and more... and more,
And, I'll show you a volunteer.

I went to a party, Mom,  I remembered what you
said.
You told me not to drink, Mom, so I drank soda
instead.

I felt really proud inside, Mom, the way you said I
would.
I didn't drink and drive, Mom, even though the
others said I should.

I know I did the right thing, Mom, I know you
were always right.
Now the party is finally ending, Mom, as
everyone is driving out of sight.

As I got into my car, Mom, I knew I'd get home in
one piece.
Because of the way you raised me, so
responsible and sweet.

I started to drive away, Mom, but as I pulled out
into the road
the other car didn't see me, Mom, and hit me like
a load.

As I lay there on the pavement, Mom, I hear the
policeman say,
the other guy is drunk, Mom, and now I'm the
one who will pay.

I'm lying here dying, Mom. I wish you'd get here
soon.
How could this happen, Mom? My life just burst
like a balloon.

There is blood all around me, Mom, and most of
it is mine.
I hear the Medic say, Mom, I'll die in a short time.

I just wanted to tell you, Mom, I swear I didn't
drink.
It was the others, Mom, the others didn't think.

He was probably at the same party as I.
The only difference is he drank and I will die.

Why do people drink, Mom? It can ruin your
whole life.
I'm feeling sharp pains now. Pains just like a
knife.

The guy who hit me is walking, Mom, and I don't
think it's fair.
I'm lying here dying and all he can do is stare.

Tell my brother not to cry, Mom, tell Daddy to be
brave.
And when I go to heaven, Mom, put "Daddy's
Girl" on my grave.

Someone should have told him, Mom, not to
drink and drive.
If only they had told him, Mom, I would still be
alive.

My breath is getting shorter, Mom, I'm becoming
very scared.
Please don't cry for me, Mom, when I needed
you, you were always there.

I have one last question, Mom, before I say
goodbye.
I didn't drink and drive, so why am I the one to
die?
or that family returning home, only to find their house and belongings damaged or lost for good.
I wish you could comprehend a wife's horror at 3a.m. as I check her husband of 40 years for a pulse and find none.
I start CPR anyway, hoping to bring him back, knowing intuitively it is too late.
But wanting his wife and family to know everything possible was done to try to save his life.

I wish you could understand how it feels to go to work in the morning after having spent most of the night at a multiple alarm fire.

I wish you could read my mind as I respond to an EMS call,
"What is wrong with the patient? Is it minor or life threatening?
Is the caller really in distress or is he waiting for us with a 2x4 or a gun?"

I wish you could be in the emergency room as a doctor pronounces dead
the beautiful five-year old girl that I have been trying to save during the past 25 minutes,
who will never go on her first date or say the words,
"I love you Mommy" again.

I wish you could know the frustration I feel in the cab of the ambulance or my personal vehicle,
the driver with his foot pressing down hard on the pedal, blowing the siren again and again,
as you fail to yield the right-of-way at an intersection or in traffic.
When you need us however, your first comment upon our arrival will be
"It took you forever to get here!"

I wish you could know my thoughts as I help extricate a girl of teenage years from the remains of her automobile.
"What if this was my sister, my girlfriend or a friend?
What were her parents reaction going to be when they opened the door to find a police officer with hat in hand?"

I wish you could know how it feels to walk in the back door and greet my parents and family, not having the heart to tell them that I
nearly did not come back from the last call.
I wish you could feel the hurt as people verbally and sometimes physically,
abuse us or belittle what I do, or as they express their attitudes of
"It will never happen to me."

I wish you could realize the physical, emotional and mental drain or missed meals,
lost sleep and forgone social activities,
in addition to all the tragedy my eyes have seen.

I wish you could know the brotherhood and self-satisfaction of helping save a life
or being able to be there in time of crisis, or creating order from total chaos.

I wish you could understand what it feels like to have a little boy tugging at your arm and asking,
"Is Mommy okay?" Not even being able to look in his eyes without tears from
your own and not knowing what to say.

Or to have to hold back a long time friend who watches his buddy having rescue breathing done on him as they take him away in
the ambulance. You know all along he did not have his seat belt on.
A sensation that I have become too familiar with.

Unless you have lived with this kind of life, you will never truly understand or appreciate who I am, we are, or what our job, our life,
really means to us...

I wish you could though.
His innocent eyes are void of hate.
He and his father weren't walking far
When they were both struck down by a drunkard's
car.
This night I know I will not sleep.
These terrible images my mind will keep.
I know these nightmares linger near.
And yet still I volunteer.

Her eyes well up - compress the chest
Say a silent prayer - then two quick breaths.
She's done this many times before,
This fight for life kneeling on the floor.
But this time it's her best friend's mom
Whose lifeless body she is working on.
This call like others will end in tears,
And yet still she volunteers.

From Slumber woke by a siren's wail
He rushes out in bitter gale.
While others sleep this stormy night,
A raging blaze this man will fight.
He bravely puts himself in danger
To save the home of a total stranger.
Body cold and tired, he feels his years,
And yet still he volunteers.

We train, we test, we do our best.
We give an awful lot of time
And don't get paid a single dime
Thanks is a word we seldom hear.
And yet still we volunteer
I want to tell that wife her husband will be home tonight
I don't want to tell them like it is,
I want to tell them lies

You didn't put their seat belts on, you feel you killed
your kids
I want to say you didn't... but in a way you did
you pound your fists into my chest, you're hurting so
inside.
I want to say you'll be O.K.,
I want to tell you lies

You left chemicals within his reach and now it's in his
eyes
I want to say your son will see, not tell you he'll be blind
you ask me if he'll be O.K., with pleading in your eyes
I want to say yes he will,
I want to tell you lies

I can see you're crying as your life goes up in smoke
If you'd maintained that smoke alarm, your children
may have woke
Don't grab my arm and ask me if your family is alive
Don't make me tell you they're all dead,
I want to tell you lies

I want to say she'll be O.K., you didn't take her life
I hear you say you love her and you'd never hurt your
wife
You thought you didn't drink too much, you thought
that you could drive
I don't want to say how wrong you were,
I want to tell you lies

You only left her for a moment, it happens all the time
How could she have fell from there? You thought she
couldn't climb
I want to say her neck's not broke, that she will be just
fine
I don't want to say she's paralyzed,
I want to tell you lies

I want to tell this teen his buddies didn't die in vain
Because he thought it'd be cool to try and beat that
train
I don't want to tell him this will haunt him all his life
I want to say that he'll forget
I want to tell him lies

You left the cabinet open and your daughter found the
gun
Now you want me to undo the damage that's been done
You tell me she's your only child you say she's only five
I don't want to say she won't see six,
I want to tell you lies

He fell into the pool when you just went to grab the
phone
It was only for a second that you left him there alone
If you only let the damn phone ring perhaps your boy
would be alive
But I don't want to tell you that,
I want to tell you lies.

The fact that you were speeding caused that car to
overturn
And we couldn't get them out of there before the whole
thing burned
Did they suffer? Yes, the suffered, as they slowly
burned alive
But I don't want to say those words,
I want to tell you lies

But I have to tell it like it is, until my shift is through
And then the real lies begin, when I come home to you
You ask me how my day was, and I say it was just fine
I hope you understand, sometimes
I have to tell you lies.
I don't even know your name
In a world of flashing lights
The sound of glass and steel breaking free,
For those few minutes, you belong only to me.
It was I who cut you shirt away
To see your broken ribs
Watching you labor with each breath
As you fought to live.
It was I who wiped the blood away
When it pooled in your eyes,
It was I who watched you heart beat
As the Jaws freed you from your car.
I was still there as we ran
To the back of the ambulance,
It was I who held your hand.
The sound of the sirens
Rang loudly in my ears
I looked for some small sign,
Your lack of response renewed my fears.
I breathed for you when you could not,
I compressed your chest when you heart wouldn't beat.
I prayed for you with each failure,
I didn't not want to see defeat.
I finally had to walk away
Knowing the battle had been lost
I saw your father in the hall way,
One look, and I saw the awful cost.
I gathered my equipment together,
And I finally learned your name.
Only 21, I said beneath my breath,
Your blood alcohol came back zero,
The driver of the other car did not.
He was alive and breathing,
No witness to the battle we fought
I don't know how to say good-bye
We never really said hello,
But a piece of you is with me
Everywhere I go.
THEY'RE JUST AMBULANCE DRIVERS THIS PLAINLY
LIGHTS AND THE SIREN
BLOWING BUT OTHER TIMES THAT SAME DRIVER
IS IN THE BACK TRYING
TO KEEP A LIFE GOING

OR THAT SAME PERSON MAY BE OUT IN THE
MUCK, THE BLOOD, AND
POURING DOWN RAIN WORKING TO GET A DRIVER
OUT OF THE CAR WHO IS
IN SEVERE PAIN

BUT THE CALL THAT HURTS THE WORST FOR ALL
EMT'S INVOLVED IS THE
CALL WITH THE CHILD WHOSE PROBLEM CANNOT
BE SOLVED

EVEN WITH ALL THE TRAINING ONE CAN POSSIBLY
HAVE TAKEN SOMETIMES
THAT TRAINING DOES NOT MAKE A DIFFERENCE

IT IS THEN THAT YOU WILL SEE THAT STRONG EMT
WITH TEARS RUNNING DOWN THEIR FACES AND A
LOOK OF HUMILITY
THE THOUGHTS OF THIS CALL WILL NEVER GO
AWAY

BUT THE EMT REALIZES THERE WILL BE ANOTHER
DAY
A DAY IN THEIR LIFE THAT THEY LISTEN FOR THE
CALL
AND WHEN THEY ARRIVE ON THE SCENE THEY
REALIZE AFTER ALL
THAT SOME DAYS ARE GOOD AND SOME DAYS
ARE BAD
BUT ONE THING FOR CERTAIN, WITHOUT THE
EMT'S LIFE WOULD CERTAINLY
BE SAD
The pager goes off I’m on my way
I give my mom a gentle kiss
For this call I can not miss
A 3 year olds heart has stopped beating
So for this I must stop eating
I grab my keys and close the door
And say goodbye just once more
I get in my truck turn on the blue light
There is a life I must save tonight
I push through the snow and down the street
Drive down to the bay in just a heartbeat
John has left his family just as I
In hopes that a child will not die
He starts up the rig and pulls it out
The ambulance radio seems to shout
We say we’re responding we’re on our way
We pray to God let us not be too late
The siren screams and the lights flash red
We rush down the road with a feeling of dread
We get to the house and grab our gear
Wailing and sobbing we both can hear
We start CPR as we were trained
After 5 minutes a pulse we have gained
We load up the child spin the stretcher about
We call the hospital to say we’re enroute
In the back of the rig she’s breathing again
On this night death had let us win
In the ER she’s doin just fine
The child should be home at dinner time
We grab all our stuff head back to the bay
We say to ourselves this was a fine day
My mom always asks me why I volunteer
24 a day 365 a year
I give her a hug a loving kiss
These are the moments I often do miss
The Lord has blessed me with a special skill
To help the injured sick and ill
For whatever the reason may be
God has made me an EMT
The EMT reflects the value of a human deed,

Their missions are grim and training takes years
Expecting no fanfares and, least of all, cheers.

No restraints on gender or shade of one's skin
They're a dedicated group and fraternal within.

They work in concert with their firefighter brothers,
Serving the community, and often...many others

Their movements precise, tending a victim is swift,
When lives are in peril, their mere presence is a gift.

Unique is their concern for saving a life.
A God-giving calling in this age of apathy and strife.

It's a labor of love... that's plain to see,
Always there when you need them... the EMT
Whatever be the call,
From dangers big or small.
I want to serve and do my best,
No matter what the scene,
I pledge to keep my skills refined,
My judgement quick and keen.
This calling to give of myself,
Most do not understand,
But I stand ready all the time,
To help my fellow man.
To have the chance to help a child,
restore his laugh with glee,
A word of thanks I might not hear,
But knowing is enough for me.
The praise of men is fine for some,
But I feel truly blessed,
Thank you, oh Lord have chosen me
To serve in E.M.S.
God wherever flames may rage,
Give me strength to save some life,
Whatever be its age.  
Help me embrace a little child,
Before it's too late, or,
Save an older person from the horror of that fate.
Enable me to be alert and
hear the weakest shout,
And quickly and efficiently to put the fire out.
I want to fill my calling and give the best in me,
To guard my every neighbor and
protect his property.
And if according to Your will I have to lose my life,
Please bless with Your protecting hand,
My children and my wife.
Image obtained from the Roberts Company, Inc. EMT Catalog. Click for more info.
Image obtained from the Roberts Company, Inc. EMT Catalog. Click for more info.
Image obtained from the Roberts Company, Inc. EMT Catalog. Click for more info.
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